Guide to Electrical Safety For Kids

Guide To Electrical Safety For Kids

Why is it hazardous to replace a fuse wire with a copper wire?

Small kids sometimes go places they shouldn’t and when it comes to electrical safety for kids, this must never be left to chance. From loose cabling around your house to cautioning about electrical home appliances, educating your children on life’s electrical security fundamentals is important to make sure that they do not injure themselves.

Whilst a typical adventurous child may wind up with a little bit of a shock and some tears, there are severe risks to be mindful of that can cause serious harm.

By taking some extremely simple and inexpensive measures you can both childproof your house from dangers and make certain your family are kept safe.  In this short article, we’ve compiled a list of our top electrical safety ideas for kids.

Electrical Safety Advice For Kids At Home

Before you start plastering your house with preventative devices, a totally economical way to keep your kids safe from electrical dangers is to consistently educate them on the dangers of electrical power. It sounds ridiculous, but we see it all too frequently where parents have actually not informed their kids and whilst they might not like being informed, their safety is your upper most priority. Here are some typical safety suggestions that you ought to be speaking with your children about.

Never put fingers in a power outlet (even it is switched off). Never ever put other items in a power outlet. Keep metal items out of toasters, ovens and anything electrical.

Never pull a plug out the socket by its cord. Never use anything with a cable or plug around water. Dry your hands before touching any electrical devices. Unplug an electrical gadget prior to cleaning it. Always switch off plug sockets when done with the device.

Outside Electrical Safety Tips For Kids

Let’s face it, you can’t constantly watch your kids Take a look at the most common safety  things you must be speaking to your kids about when playing outdoors. 

guide to electrical safety for kids/

Never fly kites or drones near power lines.
Stay away from substations. 
Do not climb up onto power poles or lamp posts.
Do not open outside switchboards. 
Do not overload a power extension with plugs.
Stay away from broken or fallen power lines. Never climb up trees that are near power lines.
Never touch metal transformer boxes.
Do not stand under a tree if there is thunder and lightning.

Electrical Safety Tips For Kids At School

Advice for school is similar but be sure to ask a teacher to put security caps on all unused electrical outlets if young children are present.

Electrical Safety Tips For Your Home

Now that you’re done mentoring your kids how to be electrical safe it’s time to look at the gadgets, electrical wiring and wall sockets around your home. On any given day, your kid may be in contact with several electrical home appliances making the safety of these devices a priority for you.

Stow plugs and cords securely away and out of reach of your kids.  Ensure home appliances that produce heat have good air circulation. Always follow home appliance guidelines. Keep clothing far away from all electrical appliances.

Examine your cords frequently for frays, cracks or kinks. Use the smallist length of extension cord possible. Do not place cables beneath rugs.   Use light bulbs with the right wattage for each fixture.

If you are uncertain whether your home cabling and sockets are childproof, why not book an electrical security inspection. We’ll allay any concerns and will also give you a wealth of recommendations about your home and how you can future proof the electrical security.

Contact a Master Electrician

Lake Road Electrical team of Master Electricians can assist you with any electrical concerns. Contact an electrician 24/7. Phone 029 128-7494

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Why Every Home Needs RCDs

Why Every Home Needs RCDs - protection against electrical shock

Kiwis are a nation that loves DIY. We like spending our weekends renovating, gardening, planting, and developing. This DIY spirit can sometimes lead to difficulties. Some jobs shouldn’t be considered DIY. Our home electrics should be left to the professionals.   You may ask “Why is it hazardous to replace a fuse wire with a copper wire?” It is still wire!

What is an RCD?

An RCD, or residual current device, is an electrical life-saving gadget that is developed to avoid you from getting a deadly electrical shock if you touch something live, such as a bare wire. It can also offer some protection against electrical fires. RCDs provide a level of individual protection that common fuses and circuit-breakers just can not provide. RCDs can be retro fitted to most old switchboards, but better yet get a switchboard upgrade.

What does an RCD do?

An RCD is a sensitive safety device that switches off electrical energy automatically if there is a fault. An RCD is created to protect against the threats of electrocution and fire triggered by earth faults. For example, if you cut through the cable television when mowing the lawn and mistakenly touched the exposed live wires or a defective device gets too hot causing electrical current to stream to earth.

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How does it work?

An RCD continuously monitors the electrical current flowing through one or more circuits it is used to protect.

If it discovers electrical power flowing down an unintended path, such as through a person who has touched a live part, the RCD will change the circuit off very quickly, substantially reducing the risk of death or serious injury. The two common milli-amp ratings on RCDs are 30mA and 10mA.  30mA– Used in basic domestic and business instances. This level of protection must trip the RCD before defibrillation of the heart can happen. 10mA– Used in Medical areas and locations with young children present such as schools and daycares. This level of protection needs to trip before muscle contraction can occur.

What are the main types of RCD?

RCDs can help safeguard you from electrical shock in possibly dangerous locations like bathrooms and gardens, and there are numerous kinds of RCDs that can be used to make sure you are always as safe as possible.

Fixed RCDs These are set up in the switchboard and can provide protection to individual or groups of circuits.

A Fixed RCD supplies the greatest level of security as it protects all the circuitry and the sockets on a circuit, and any linked home appliances.

Socket-Outlet RCDs These are unique socket-outlets with an RCD constructed into them which can be used in place of a standard socket outlet. This kind of RCD offers security only to the individual in contact with devices, including its lead, plugged into the unique socket-outlet. You can normally find these in the restrooms of older homes where they do not have an RCD at the switchboard.

Portable RCDs These plug into any basic socket outlet. A home appliance can then be plugged into the RCD.

They are useful when neither fixed, nor socket-outlet RCDs are offered however, as with socket-outlet RCDs, they offer security only to the individual in contact with the equipment, including its lead, plugged into the portable RCD.

How much will RCD protection cost?

A plug-in RCD can cost just $25, Portable RCDs around $50 and fixed RCDs will cost more, however will offer a greater degree of protection to help keep your household safe as they cover an entire circuit covering several outlets.

Setup costs will vary. We can quickly give you a quote once we have discussed what you require.

How do I check whether I already have fixed RCD protection?

To check if you have actually fixed RCD protection, go to your switchboard and take a look to see if there is a gadget with a push button marked ‘T’ or ‘Test’.

This ‘test’ button becomes part of an RCD. Do not forget to check– You need to evaluate all fixed and socket RCDs about every three months.  It is recommended that portable RCDs be evaluated each time you use them.

If you hold the test button in for a long period of time and the RCD does not turn off the electrical energy supply, then get advice from a registered electrician. As with everything electrical If you have any concerns or issues about an RCD or want to check your residential or commercial property, call Lake Road Electrical.

If you have an electrical maintenance concern, a remodeling project, or just wish to learn more about how we can help you, don’t hesitate to call.

Contact a Master Electrician
Lake Road Electrical team of Master Electricians can assist you with any electrical concerns. Contact an electrician 24/7. Phone 029 128-7494

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Why is it hazardous to replace a fuse wire with a copper wire?

Why is it hazardous to replace a fuse wire with a copper wire?

Why is it hazardous to replace a fuse wire with a copper wire?

Kiwis are a nation that loves DIY. We like spending our weekends renovating, gardening, planting, and developing. This DIY spirit can sometimes lead to difficulties. Some jobs shouldn’t be considered DIY. Our home electrics should be left to the professionals.   You may ask “Why is it hazardous to replace a fuse wire with a copper wire?” It is still wire!

You must be able to use electricity correctly. This could cause fire and death. Simple mistakes such as replacing fuse wires with standard copper wires can result in a disaster. Lake Road Electrical visited a client’s house recently and found they were in danger of an electric fire. This was all thanks to a small piece of copper wire. Here’s what actually happened.

But first let’s begin by looking at the purpose of a fuse.

A fuse can be used to remove power from a system that is not working properly. Circuit breakers can be used to replace fuses but they have substantially different characteristics.

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A fuse can be described as a piece of wire made from a material with low melting points. Copper wire is not a good choice for a fuse because of its high melting point (approx 1094 degrees C). Copper wire is resistant to heat and will not melt when it is exposed to high-voltage currents.

A 5A means a fuse which can carry 5 amperes of current. If the capacity of a fuse is 5A it will NOT withstand currents greater than 5A. The fuse wire will then melt, breaking the circuit.

Is it possible for a fuse to be replaced by another piece of wire?

You can never replace a fuse using a piece of metal wire. So no, you cannot use copper wire to replace a fuse. Because of its higher melting point, and low resistance, current can flow though copper wire without melting it.

electrical hazards in the home

It is never recommended that you bypass any fuse in this way, especially when dealing with a blown one. By using a wire as a bypass to a fuse, you can set off fire or even cause death by electrocution. Don’t take any chances!

A nightmare story ….

I was called upon to investigate a complaint by the owner about a loud popping sound coming out of the kitchen wall. The owner would hear the noise around 10-15 minutes following turning on the stove. After hearing the sound, the cable was checked for any issues. One problem was that rodents had been chewing it. The most concerning though, was the fuse for the stove.  Someone had taken out the fuse and changed it to standard copper wire. This could be because the rodents chewed on the wire and it blew several times. This basic DIY job could have cost the family their entire home or someone’s life.

electrical cable installation

The cable was susceptible to catch fire.  However, the owner was very fortunate to have the fire extinguish itself in the wall and not continue to burn.

What caused this problem?

What are your options to stop this type of fire from happening at your location? The fire started when the fuse wire was replaced with copper wire.  RCD’s would have been a much better choice or replace with proper fuse wire.

Understanding the risks requires that we take a step back to see what a fuse does. A fuse is a safety tool that protects appliances and wiring. It can also prevent the possibility of electrical fires. A fuse is simply a section of wire designed to deliver a minimal amount of current. If the wire becomes too hot or it experiences excessive flow, it can melt. When this happens, the circuit is cut and the current is stopped.

lake road electrical hot on safety

This protects you and prevents fires. This melting does not happen if the fuse wire is made of copper. Copper has a melting point higher than the fuse wire tin. Copper wire can heat up at high current but not melt.

Instead, it causes an instant short circuit that can damage your appliance and ignite a fire.

What should You Do?

While it can be frustrating to have a fuse blow, keep in mind that it is happening for your security. It is best to have an electrician perform any electrical work within your house.

If you’re replacing the fuse yourself, be sure to use the right rated fuse wire and not copper wire. Although it is very rare that the fuse wire found in stoves has been replaced with copper, we still find copper wire in power systems that continue to blow.

You may experience an increased level of electrical current in your house for a variety of reasons. The fuses will protect you from danger by protecting you. Do not fall for the temptation to use copper wire with a fuse that has already blown many times.  Better yet get RCD’s installed in your old switchboard.

Lake Road Electrical will help you to determine the source of your problem. The fuse wire is there for your safety. If the fuse wire was replaced with copper wire, the circuit cannot stop in the event of an emergency and there is the possibility of a large fire. 

Contact a Master Electrician
Lake Road Electrical team of Master Electricians can assist you with any electrical concerns. Contact an electrician 24/7. Phone 029 128-7494

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